'Never seen anything like this': European leaders view Caribbean islands devastated by Irma

Share on

European leaders visit Caribbean territories on Tuesday, trying to quell accusations by residents that European

France's president, Britain's foreign secretary and the Dutch king on Tuesday were visiting Caribbean territories that were hammered by Hurricane Irma, trying to quell accusations by residents that European governments were slow to prepare, slow to react and sometimes even racist in their responses to the devastation.

French President Emmanuel Macron's plane brought water, food and tons of medicine and emergency equipment. His first stop was Guadeloupe, an overseas department of France, where he landed Tuesday morning.

Macron eventually was heading to meet with residents of the French-Dutch island of St. Martin, where 10 people were killed on the French side and four on the Dutch. He will finish his trip on the nearby island of St. Barts.

Macron is being accompanied by doctors and experts who will be in charge of evaluating the damage.

About 1,500 French troops, police and emergency workers already are on the ground to help islanders, and 500 others were expected to arrive in the coming days, according to French authorities. But residents on the island have spoken of hunger, homelessness, a lack of water and a feeling of abandonment after the hurricane pummeled the region on Wednesday. Some complained that the French government spent more efforts rescuing white tourists than black or mixed-race islanders.

Irma left entire islands and tens of thousands of people in the Caribbean without water or electricity and reduced many homes to splinters. The French, British and Dutch governments sent warships, planes and security forces to keep order and deliver aid, but some of that was slowed further by Hurricane Jose, which passed north of the region over the weekend.

A medical center was being set up Tuesday in the stadium of Marigot, a port on St. Martin, and a French military ship will provide additional medical facilities in coming days, French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said.

He told reporters that air and sea connections with the French Caribbean islands should gradually return to normal by the end of the week, allowing up to 2,500 people a day to leave the island.

Dutch King Willem-Alexander arrived on St. Martin on Monday and said the scenes of devastation are the worst he has seen. The island is shared between a French territory and the former Dutch colony of St. Maarten, a largely autonomous part of the Dutch kingdom with a population of around 40,000.

"I've never experienced anything like this before, and I've seen a lot of natural disasters in my life. I've seen a lot of war zones in my life. But I've never seen anything like this," Willem-Alexander said on the Dutch national network NOS.

Willem-Alexander said he was encouraged to see residents already working together to rebuild the shattered capital of Philipsburg.

"It's been very useful to see for myself what terrible damage this storm has done and in this way to also show the population of St. Martin and the governor and prime minister that we stand together here as a kingdom and that we will solve this together," he told reporters on the island.

Willem-Alexander was to fly Tuesday to the nearby Dutch islands of Saba and St. Eustatius, which also were hit by Irma, but suffered less damage than St. Martin.

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson will be visiting the British Virgin Islands and Anguilla to see the relief effort firsthand. On Monday, Johnson defended the government's response amid claims it was slow to help the British overseas territories, saying there had been an "unprecedented" effort to deal with the aftermath of the storm. At least five people died in the British territories.

Dutch Foreign Minister Bert Koenders said he thinks the European Union should send relief funds to both the French and the Dutch sides of the island, despite their differing relationships with their former colonial powers.

"We believe, in any case, that everybody should benefit from that money," he told reporters after a Cabinet meeting was called to discuss the fallout from Hurricane Irma.

Koenders said he also would appeal for help from the United Nations for the islands.

-and-apos;never-seen-anything-like-this-and-apos;-european-leaders-view-caribbean-islands-devastated-by-irma photo 1 CAPTION

Apple has announced two new iPhones. This year, Los Angeles saw its lowest number of homicides in a summer since the 1960s. If Democrats want to take back the House in 2018, they need to win in California. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders remain underrepresented on prime-time TV shows, according to a new study.

Apple has announced two new iPhones. This year, Los Angeles saw its lowest number of homicides in a summer since the 1960s. If Democrats want to take back the House in 2018, they need to win in California. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders remain underrepresented on prime-time TV shows, according to a new study.

-and-apos;never-seen-anything-like-this-and-apos;-european-leaders-view-caribbean-islands-devastated-by-irma photo 2 CAPTION

Apple has announced two new iPhones. This year, Los Angeles saw its lowest number of homicides in a summer since the 1960s. If Democrats want to take back the House in 2018, they need to win in California. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders remain underrepresented on prime-time TV shows, according to a new study.

Apple has announced two new iPhones. This year, Los Angeles saw its lowest number of homicides in a summer since the 1960s. If Democrats want to take back the House in 2018, they need to win in California. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders remain underrepresented on prime-time TV shows, according to a new study.

-and-apos;never-seen-anything-like-this-and-apos;-european-leaders-view-caribbean-islands-devastated-by-irma photo 3 CAPTION

Irma’s death toll in the U.S. barely hit the double digits. NASA's Cassini spacecraft set off for Saturn in 1997. The mission, built and flown by JPL, has been a huge scientific success. The Dodgers have lost 15 of their last 16 games. James Franco’s “The Disaster Artist” is the behind the scenes story of “The Room."

Irma’s death toll in the U.S. barely hit the double digits. NASA's Cassini spacecraft set off for Saturn in 1997. The mission, built and flown by JPL, has been a huge scientific success. The Dodgers have lost 15 of their last 16 games. James Franco’s “The Disaster Artist” is the behind the scenes story of “The Room."

-and-apos;never-seen-anything-like-this-and-apos;-european-leaders-view-caribbean-islands-devastated-by-irma photo 4 CAPTION

The Times' Gary Klein and Lindsey Thiry discuss the latest developments in the Aaron Donald situation as the Rams prepare for Week 2 against the Washington Redskins, plus two players sign contract extensions and a look back at a dominant victory over the Indianapolis Colts in the opener. 

The Times' Gary Klein and Lindsey Thiry discuss the latest developments in the Aaron Donald situation as the Rams prepare for Week 2 against the Washington Redskins, plus two players sign contract extensions and a look back at a dominant victory over the Indianapolis Colts in the opener. 

-and-apos;never-seen-anything-like-this-and-apos;-european-leaders-view-caribbean-islands-devastated-by-irma photo 5 CAPTION

On the night of July 26, a vehicle went through a guardrail on Highway 180, plunging 500 feet into the Kings River. River conditions were monitored daily to determine when a recovery operation could take place. The flow of the river gradually decreased and the bodies were recovered Sept. 1. 

On the night of July 26, a vehicle went through a guardrail on Highway 180, plunging 500 feet into the Kings River. River conditions were monitored daily to determine when a recovery operation could take place. The flow of the river gradually decreased and the bodies were recovered Sept. 1. 

-and-apos;never-seen-anything-like-this-and-apos;-european-leaders-view-caribbean-islands-devastated-by-irma photo 6 CAPTION

The storm ravaged through the state early Sunday. It has ripped roofs from homes, flooded neighborhoods and nearly 4.5 million are without power.

The storm ravaged through the state early Sunday. It has ripped roofs from homes, flooded neighborhoods and nearly 4.5 million are without power.

Share on
Article 'Never seen anything like this': European leaders view Caribbean islands devastated by Irma compiled by Original article here

You might also like