Public disciplinary trials scheduled for five Baltimore police officers in Freddie Gray case

Share on

Trials for the five officers facing internal discipline by the Baltimore Police Department in connection with the death

Trials for the five officers facing internal discipline by the Baltimore Police Department in connection with the arrest and death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray in 2015 have been scheduled, according to the department’s online trial board schedule and a police union attorney.

The trial of Officer Caesar Goodson Jr., the driver of the police van in which prosecutors said Gray suffered his fatal neck injuries, is scheduled from Oct. 30 to Nov. 3.

Lt. Brian Rice’s trial is Nov. 13-17; Sgt. Alicia White’s is Dec. 5-11; Officer Garrett Miller’s is Dec. 18-19; and Officer Edward Nero’s is Dec. 20-21.

The trials are open to the public.

The department’s online schedule lists the trials, but not the officers’ names. Michael Davey, an attorney for the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3, confirmed the above schedule. He otherwise declined to comment.

public-disciplinary-trials-scheduled-for-five-baltimore-police-officers-in-freddie-gray-case photo 1 Justin Fenton

Five Baltimore police officers involved in the 2015 arrest and death of Freddie Gray have been charged with violating department rules, with three of them facing termination, The Baltimore Sun has learned.

The three who face firing are Officer Caesar Goodson, who was driving the van where an autopsy...

Five Baltimore police officers involved in the 2015 arrest and death of Freddie Gray have been charged with violating department rules, with three of them facing termination, The Baltimore Sun has learned.

The three who face firing are Officer Caesar Goodson, who was driving the van where an autopsy...

(Justin Fenton)

Police did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Baltimore Sun first reported that the five officers faced internal charges — and that Goodson, Rice and White face firing — in May, after investigators from the Montgomery and Howard county police departments finished their review of the case.

The Baltimore Police Department had asked the county police departments to conduct the investigation to avoid a conflict of interest.

The officers had the option of accepting department punishments rather than going to a trial board. All declined, electing to go before the trial boards instead.

Gray’s death in April 2015 sparked widespread protests in Baltimore, and rioting, looting and arson broke out on the day of his funeral. Millions of dollars in damage occurred in the city, which was put under a weeklong nightly curfew amid the unrest.

The five officers and a sixth were charged criminally in the case, though all pleaded not guilty and none was convicted. Goodson, Rice and Nero were each acquitted at trial, after which Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby dropped the charges against White, Miller and the sixth officer, William Porter.

Porter had previously gone to trial, but that ended with a hung jury and a mistrial.

Porter is not facing any internal discipline.

The police union previously denounced the decision by the department to bring internal charges against the five other officers and hold trial boards, saying the internal cases will “do nothing more than perpetuate a police force hesitant to exercise judgment when interacting with the public.”

The scheduled duration of the officers’ upcoming trials is unusual. Most trial boards do not go beyond one day. However, the cases against the officers in Gray’s arrest and death amassed huge amounts of evidence, in part because they were tried in criminal court first.

public-disciplinary-trials-scheduled-for-five-baltimore-police-officers-in-freddie-gray-case photo 2 CAPTION

Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby talks about why her team decided to drop the charges against the officers in the Freddie Gray case. (Kevin Richardson/Baltimore Sun video)

Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby talks about why her team decided to drop the charges against the officers in the Freddie Gray case. (Kevin Richardson/Baltimore Sun video)

public-disciplinary-trials-scheduled-for-five-baltimore-police-officers-in-freddie-gray-case photo 3 CAPTION

"I think most of the blame falls to the prosecutor who failed to prosecute the case and brought cases that she didn't have the evidence for," Gov. Larry Hogan said. (Erin Cox/Baltimore Sun video)

"I think most of the blame falls to the prosecutor who failed to prosecute the case and brought cases that she didn't have the evidence for," Gov. Larry Hogan said. (Erin Cox/Baltimore Sun video)

krector@baltsun.com

twitter.com/rectorsun

Share on
Article Public disciplinary trials scheduled for five Baltimore police officers in Freddie Gray case compiled by www.baltimoresun.com