Letters: Here's why P.G.T. Beauregard's statue should not have been removed

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'After the Civil War ended in 1865,' one of your recent letter writers noted, 'the nation resolved to disunite, to

"After the Civil War ended in 1865," one of your recent letter writers noted, "the nation resolved to disunite, to institute white supremacy through segregation and to give that disunification the official stamp of constitutionality with Plessy v. Ferguson (sic) in 1896." Lincoln’s second inaugural address concerned those wanting to punish the South: With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow, and his orphan . . ."

Here's a thought from Hodding Carter's book on Reconstruction:"Lincoln was not yet in his grave when the architects of political revolution began drawing up their blueprints for the new order (Reconstruction) . . . they had begun even before he became president." 

This nation was very divided at the end of the Civil War, and the government was determined to keep it so until it determined what states and citizens were worthy of readmission to the United States.

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Group threatens to sue City Park over fate of Beauregard monument

One of the opponents of removing the monument to P.G.T. Beauregard, the Confederate general,…

The radical Reconstruction of the South intended to keep the nation divided until the former Confederate states had been punished and only re-admitted after satisfying certain conditions imposed by radical Republicans, led by Congressmen Thad Stevens, Pennsylvania and Benjamin "Spoons" Butler, Massachusetts, the Union general in charge of forces occupying New Orleans from its capture on May 1, 1862, until Lincoln removed him from command the following December.

After the Civil War, the nation tried to reunite and it was decades later, after Reconstruction had failed, that the divisions causing problems today arose.

Incidentally, the Louisiana citizen most in favor of "complete political equality for the Negro, division of state offices between the races, and the abandonment of segregation in public places…conveniences, and public schools" was Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, CSA, whose statue was recently unceremoniously removed. 

Charles P. Carriere III

retired attorney

New Orleans

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